Labour mayor blasted as furious Edward Colston statue row erupts on Jeremy Vine

Labour mayor blasted as furious Edward Colston statue row erupts on Jeremy Vine

Labour mayor blasted in Colston statue row on Jeremy Vine

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Conservative commentator Andrew Pierce has slammed Bristol’s Labour mayor, Marvin Rees, after a court decision to clear four people of tearing down a statue of slave trader Edward Colston last summer. He told Jeremy Vine that the decision meant the UK’s rules-based system of law had been replaced by one govern by “values.” “That’s a really, really disturbing precedent,” he told the Channel 5 show. 

Mr Pierce told Jeremy Vine: “We’ve got a system in this country it used to be a rules-based system of law.

“This decision means it’s now becoming a values-based decision of law.

“In other words, the law can be bent depending on the values of the people who choose to break it.

“That’s a really, really disturbing precedent. 

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“What other ones will there be?

“We don’t like x so we can tear a statue down, we don’t like a picture because it offends us we could tear it off the wall.

“It’s a very, very disturbing development.

“And I’m surprised that Shay [Grewal] doesn’t think that Marvin Rees, the first mayor of black descent elected in this country, didn’t do something about it in the four years he was mayor before the vandals tore it down.”

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Discussing the jury’s verdict at Bristol Crown Court on Wednesday, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps argued Britain is not a country where “destroying public property can ever be acceptable.”

Mr Shapps said: “We do have a clause in the Police, Crime and Sentencing Bill which will perhaps close a potential loophole and mean you can’t just go round and cause vandalism, destroy the public realm, and then essentially not be prosecuted.”

“I don’t want to be seen to be commenting on an individual case, it had a jury, they made the decision, they would have seen all the facts.

“But as a broader point, I would say we’re not in a country where destroying public property can ever be acceptable.”

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He added: “We live in a democratic country.

“If you want to see things changed you can get them changed, you do that through the ballot box, or petitioning your local council, etc.

“You don’t do it by going out and causing criminal damage.

“We’ll always be on the side of the law and when necessary we will fix any loopholes in the law to make sure that’s always the case.”

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